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Workshop – high quality, video, photography and audio capture with smartphones

High quality media capture with smartphones

This enjoyable and practical workshop provides participants with the knowledge and skills to record the best quality media with their smartphones.

The session has been offered as part of staff development activities, for startup businesses looking to shoot their own crowd funding videos and for groups who want to learn these skills for fun.

Topics covered;

  • preparation
  • focus and exposure control
  • supports and stabilising
  • audio recording
  • video recording
  • Advanced photography, video and audio features
  • Apps for capture and editing
Using a gimbal to stabilise video on smartphone

Stabilising a smartphone

Workshops can be tailored to 1:1 sessions up to groups of over 100 attendees. While based in the Bath and Bristol area this workshop has been delivered to companies and organisations across the UK.

Clients include; Microsoft, Marcus Evans Linguarama, University of Bath, Royal Photographic Society, WI, 

Video of 14,000 TEU container ship

Produce, Consume, Dispose, Repeat…….

Our modern economies are now highly dependent on consumer spending. When in recession, governments often rely on a ‘consumer led recovery’ to bring the economy into the black. ‘Consumer confidence’ is a measure of the strength of an economy. Uncontrolled consumption however is unsustainable. In the west, we are consuming goods at an ever greater speed, the resources we consume are difficult or impossible to replenish while the carbon released and pollution created is leading to a rapidly degraded natural environment.

A fleet of huge container ships is needed to bring the goods we consume to our doors in The West. The ship in the video carries up to 14,000 containers. The largest currently at sea carry around 21,000 containers and there are plans to build even larger ships in the near future.

The video has been created as part of a project I am working on in my MA in Fine Art.

Global trade

Each year, nearly twice the number of Ikea catalogues are printed than copies of the bible. This makes it the most printed book in the world. Much of what Ikea sell is manufactured in the Far East and transported to its stores in the West. The paper ships in this illustration are made from pages from the current Ikea catalogue.

paper ships - global trade

paper ships – global trade

Fishing line found on Welsh beach

These photographs are of fishing line found on a North Pembrokeshire beach and are part of a project on plastic in the sea. More images of this project will appear shortly.

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Abandoned fishing line found on a Welsh beach

Giants from behind the horizon

This is part of a new project exploring consumer culture. As the project develops, I plan to look at consumption on the high street and online, the people and machinery that transport these goods to us and what happens when we have finished with them.

My interest in international trade and shipping grew from two commercial commissions that I had at around the same time. The first was for a large marine insurance company where I took a series of images on a brand new Maersk container ship.  At the time, in 1998 it was state of the art and the largest ship of its type in the world. By modern standards, the same ship would be a baby compared to the current monsters. Many of today’s ships can carry over 20,000 shipping containers.

In the same year I had a commission in Bangladesh and I had the opportunity to take pictures of the Ship Breakers of Chittagong. On one of the longest beaches in the world, gangs of workers dismantle huge ships often with little more than hand tools and with little understanding of health and safety. These ships had reached the end of their working lives, they contained toxic harmful products and dismantling in The West would be unsafe and uneconomic so this work is ‘shipped out’ to the developing world. I saw numerous workers carrying bales of asbestos from the engine rooms of a ship they were working on.

Ship breakers, Chittagong, Bangladesh

Ship breakers, Chittagong, Bangladesh

Ship breakers, Bangladesh

Ship breakers, Bangladesh

As a species, the human race currently consumes 50% more resources than the planet can provide.

Consumer spending (consumption) is often used as a measure of the strength of an economy. Advertising companies assign status to the products they promote and we the consumers acquire this status along with the items we purchase. Today’s must have item is tomorrow’s landfill. Unless we can find a way to increase the life of the products we buy or find a way to recycle them completely, consumer culture in its current form is unsustainable.

MSC Anna being unloaded at Felixtowe

MSC Anna being unloaded at Felixtowe

As a post-industrial state, 90% of what we use is imported. To make this possible, a fleet of giant container ships circle the world.

Some of these ships can transport over 20,000 containers. If all of these containers were loaded onto lorries and parked in a line, the queue would be around 330KM in length, longer than the M4 motorway.

MSC Anna about to set sail, Felixtowe

MSC Anna about to set sail, Felixtowe

Occasionally, we might see a distant shadow on the horizon but most of the time these monsters occupy a world out of our sight. This part of the project aims to link the shadows that pass in the distance to our unstoppable appetite for ‘stuff’.

MSC Anna bound for Antwerp

Dali bound for Bremerhaven

Bora Bay bound for Zeebrugge

Bore Bay bound for Zeebrugge

Maersk Mkinney bound for Hamburg

Maersk Mc Kinney Moller bound for Hamburg

OOCL bound for Rotterdam

OOCL Scandinavia bound for Port Said

OCCL Scandinavia

OOCL Scandinavia in port

There are 6 OOCL ships including the Scandinavia which all currently share the title of the largest container ships currently at sea. Each of these ships can carry 21413 containers.

Maersk McKinnery

OOCL Scandinavia

Maersk McKinney in port Felixtowe

Maersk Mc Kinney Moller in port, Felixtowe

MSV Anna can carry over 19,300 containers

The ships that bring their bounty from where most goods are manufactured in China and South East Asia have little of value to ship back. In the past, our waste products were crammed into containers where they were disposed of in the developing world. The developing world no longer wants our waste and so often containers return empty or don’t return at all. They serve a new life as glamping pods, pop-up coffee shops, stables or site offices.

Refuse centre next to container port

‘Recycling Centre’ next to container port  (the site office is an recycled container)

As ‘good’ consumers, we need to continually buy new items and obey the advertisers who tell us that we will be better, be more popular,  have greater status and be more attractive if we buy the latest gadget. Often goods fail shortly after the warranty expires, repair is expensive and difficult, replacement is cheap and easy. The failed item is discarded and often finds its way into landfill. Despite major developments in material science (lightbulbs that can last a lifetime) we have learnt to accept that items will fail and need replacing.

2 month old faulty picture frame showing MV Autosun passing boating lake at Portishead with a cargo of up to 2000 cars from Bilbao to Portbury